Past Recipes
Flounder en Papillote

Flounder en Papillote with Israeli Couscous, Broccoli, and Gremolata

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This flounder's baked en papillotte (a French parchment paper technique that we hack with a foil pouch), allowing it to steam and infuse with butter and white wine. Served over broccoli and Israeli couscous, it's finished with garlic, lemon, parsley, and brown butter–fried almonds.

  • < 600 Calories
Serving size
2servings
Prep & cook time
minutes
Cooking Skill
easy
By Chef Grace

By Chef Grace

  • Calories 590
  • Protein 27g
  • Total Carb 50g
  • Total Fat 31g

Given the cook-at-home nature of Plated and natural variation in ingredients, nutritional information is approximated. See details.

Ingredients & Equipment

What we send

  • broccoli florets
    • 6 ounces
    • broccoli florets
  • lemon
    • 1
    • lemon
  • unsalted butter
    • 3 packets
    • unsalted butter
  • parsley
    • 1/4 ounce
    • parsley
  • garlic
    • 1 clove
    • garlic
  • flounder
    • 10 ounces
    • flounder
  • white wine
    • 2 tablespoons
    • white wine
  • Israeli couscous
    • 3/4 cup
    • Israeli couscous
  • sliced almonds
    • 2 tablespoons
    • sliced almonds

What You’ll Need

  • olive oil
  • kosher salt
  • black pepper
  • 8" medium pot
  • aluminum foil
  • baking sheet
  • 8" small pan

Allergens

Milk, Fish, Tree Nuts, Wheat

Cooking Steps

  1. Prepare ingredients

    Prepare ingredients

    Preheat oven to 450°F. Bring a medium pot of water to a boil over high heat. Rinse all produce. Roughly chop broccoli into ½-inch pieces. If you have a zester and want to infuse your gremolata with even more flavor, zest up to whole lemon, then halve. Unwrap 2 packets butter and cut into small dice for Step 3.

  2. Make gremolata

    Make gremolata

    Finely chop parsley leaves and stems and garlic together until well combined and no large pieces remain. Transfer to a small bowl and add juice of 1 lemon, lemon zest (if using), 1 tablespoon olive oil, ¼ teaspoon salt, and pepper as desired. Stir to combine. Set gremolata aside until ready to serve.

  3. Prepare flounder en papillote

    Prepare flounder en papillote

    Pat flounder dry with paper towel. Place a large piece of foil on a baking sheet. Fold foil in half to crease, then reopen. Arrange flounder in a single layer on 1 side of crease. Pour over white wine, then season with ½ teaspoon salt and pepper as desired. Dot with diced butter, then fold foil over fish, bringing edges together. Tuck and crimp edges to create a tight seal.

  4. Bake fish and cook couscous

    Bake fish and cook couscous

    Transfer sheet with papillote to oven and bake until flounder is opaque and cooked through, 7-8 minutes. Meanwhile, once water is boiling, stir in couscous and cook until almost tender, about 7 minutes. Then, add broccoli and continue to cook until bright green, 1 minute more. Drain and return to pot, off heat. Stir in 1 tablespoon olive oil and ½ teaspoon salt to combine.

  5. Fry almonds

    Fry almonds

    While couscous cooks, heat remaining butter in a small pan over medium heat. When butter is foamy, add almonds and ⅛ teaspoon salt. Cook, stirring frequently, until golden brown and fragrant, 3-4 minutes. Remove pan from heat and set aside.

  6. Plate flounder en papillote

    Plate flounder en papillote

    Divide Israeli couscous and broccoli between serving plates. Carefully open papillote and transfer flounder to plates with couscous, drizzling over any white wine–butter sauce from parcel. Spoon over gremolata and garnish with fried almonds. Enjoy!

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